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bookriot.com

erikadprice

It is clear that diversity is not a priority for ReedPop and BEA. Either they are not thinking about it at all, or they are actively choosing against diversity because they believe they can make more money with an all-white line-up. These are not our values at Book Riot, and so we will not be supporting, promoting, participating in, covering, or encouraging our community to attend BookCon. We can’t control ReedPop and BEA’s choices, but we can control this. No diversity = no support.

Readers Deserve Better Than BookCon | BOOK RIOT (via bookriot)

Fuck yeah, BR!

(via bookriot)

gofundme.com

erikadprice

ericboydblog:

Hello everyone,
Last week I found out that I was accepted into the Tin House Summer Writing workshop in Portland this July. It is a huge opportunity for me and I’m very glad they enjoyed my manuscript. However, I did not get the scholarship I applied for, which makes my getting to the workshop damn near impossible.
I’m hoping that’s where you good folks can come in. I credit you guys on Tumblr for helping me have this opportunity. I strongly believe my practice of daily six worders (not to mention all of the requests I reply to) have really helped me hone my fiction to this point. Clearly it worked well enough for Tin House to take notice, but it won’t matter unless I can get there!
So… For the last few days I’ve been raising money on GoFundMe to make it to Tin House’s workshop. The fees rack up to $1700, and that doesn’t even include travel costs (which are roughly $500 if I book very soon). On GoFundMe I’m asking for that initial $1700—I’m a little over halfway there, but I honestly need the entire amount to make it. I just don’t have the money. I really needed that scholarship. On a personal note, I work as a dishwasher/line cook 5 days a week and attend an MFA in a different state for the other 2—those travel costs alone cut deep into my paychecks—not to mention that this winter has seen more than a couple $200+ gas bills.
I must pay a deposit to save my spot on this workshop ASAP. The total amount isn’t due until June 1, but I need to get most of the money very soon.
I hope you guys will consider donating, or even just sharing this page. People can donate as much as they like, and anyone who donates will get a six worder; there are also donation ‘silver’ and ‘gold’ levels where you can have a handwritten or typed six worders / short stories mailed to you! Thanks to everyone who’s helped me to this point, and thanks to anyone that likes, reblogs, or otherwise spreads the word for me!
—Eric
http://www.gofundme.com/ericboydtinhouse2014

I donated! Have you? Remember, if you help support Eric Boyd now, you can bask in his reflected glory when he’s a huge NYT Bestseller, and get a small vicarious self-esteem bump in the process. 

ericboydblog:

Hello everyone,

Last week I found out that I was accepted into the Tin House Summer Writing workshop in Portland this July. It is a huge opportunity for me and I’m very glad they enjoyed my manuscript. However, I did not get the scholarship I applied for, which makes my getting to the workshop damn near impossible.

I’m hoping that’s where you good folks can come in. I credit you guys on Tumblr for helping me have this opportunity. I strongly believe my practice of daily six worders (not to mention all of the requests I reply to) have really helped me hone my fiction to this point. Clearly it worked well enough for Tin House to take notice, but it won’t matter unless I can get there!

So… For the last few days I’ve been raising money on GoFundMe to make it to Tin House’s workshop. The fees rack up to $1700, and that doesn’t even include travel costs (which are roughly $500 if I book very soon). On GoFundMe I’m asking for that initial $1700—I’m a little over halfway there, but I honestly need the entire amount to make it. I just don’t have the money. I really needed that scholarship. On a personal note, I work as a dishwasher/line cook 5 days a week and attend an MFA in a different state for the other 2—those travel costs alone cut deep into my paychecks—not to mention that this winter has seen more than a couple $200+ gas bills.

I must pay a deposit to save my spot on this workshop ASAP. The total amount isn’t due until June 1, but I need to get most of the money very soon.

I hope you guys will consider donating, or even just sharing this page. People can donate as much as they like, and anyone who donates will get a six worder; there are also donation ‘silver’ and ‘gold’ levels where you can have a handwritten or typed six worders / short stories mailed to you! Thanks to everyone who’s helped me to this point, and thanks to anyone that likes, reblogs, or otherwise spreads the word for me!

—Eric

http://www.gofundme.com/ericboydtinhouse2014

I donated! Have you? Remember, if you help support Eric Boyd now, you can bask in his reflected glory when he’s a huge NYT Bestseller, and get a small vicarious self-esteem bump in the process. 

kaylapocalypse

erikadprice

How to Write Women of Color and Men of Color if you are White.

kaylapocalypse:

A colleague of mine was talking to me recently about her misgivings about her capabilities regarding writing Women of Color. She wanted very badly to include several WOC characters in her sci-fantasy series, but she had some concerns about correct portrayal and writing them in a way that wouldn’t instantly piss people off. I told her I would write something about it that might help. So, here we have it: How to write POC without pissing everyone off and doing a horrible job.

In general, it comes down to three things. Research, Persistence and Consideration. Also. for the point of this essay, I am going to use Black women, Native Women and Mixed Race women as they each represent different individual (yet very important) racial struggles that need consideration.

1. Research is by far the most important thing. EVER. For this example, I am going to use black women.

It is important to start by trying your hardest to forget anything you think you know about black women and black female identity. As a white person, anything you would know about them you probably learned from media that is not controlled by or monitored by black women themselves. Meaning that it is likely not a good representation of black women at all. Or maybe you just have a black friend.

Which you should consider in the same way you would a control group for a science experiment.

One or two subjects would not provide conclusive evidence in regards to any hypothesis. Having one or two or even five black friends can’t help you with understanding the complex history of black discourse….

In order to start from scratch, I would first spend some time reading literature written by black women for black women. Learning the way black women have discourse among each other is the first step to understanding their perspective AND emulating their voice. Literature is the genre of media where POC have the most liberty (unlike film) to discuss certain topics or parts of their identity.

Then, I would delve into “complaints”. There are thousands upon thousands of articles where black women complain about their portrayal in media. These complaints are both valid and often eloquently expressed. It is important for you to know, what things black women (WOC) are already so fucking tired of seeing in regards to incorrect or offensive portrayals of themselves. Not only will it help you avoid making the same mistakes as white writers before you (an example of this: Arthur Golden and the hot mess that is Memoirs of a Geisha), But it will also get you upset about certain ways black women (POC women in general) are portrayed, and make you want to write them better. This can improve your writing in that not only will you avoid being offensive, but you now have the chance to be progressive and kick stereotypes out the window! 

Finally, I would take some time to follow some tumblr blogs that are run by the group you’re trying to write. This part of the research can really help because you’ll get a first hand, contemporary dialogue about issues within the specific POC community.  Which leads me to my second topic…

Read More

erikadprice

Click here to support Tin House Summer Writing Workshop by Eric Boyd

Eric Boyd is a fantastic writer and a lovely human being. I am certain he’s going to, as they say, make it fucking big. Help him get to the Tin House Summer Writing Workshop. 

lastnightsreading

erikadprice

lastnightsreading:

Gary Shteyngart at NYU, 4/17/14

lastnightsreading:

Gary Shteyngart at NYU, 4/17/14

bitterandcurt

erikadprice

bitterandcurt:

I keep seeing and talking to people who fret over how to write PoC characters because they feel like they can’t win either way. They don’t want to make them the villain because of the unfortunate implications but they also feel trapped into making them perfect with no character flaws.

Guys. There’s an easy way out of this.

Have more than one person of color. The reason you keep having trouble with this is because your cast of a dozen important characters has exactly one character who isn’t white. That’s why it makes it seem like they are representing or speaking for their entire race.

Have a more diverse cast and treat them like three-dimensional people.

And for the love of all things good, keep intersectionality in mind. A White gay man and a Black gay man likely have very different experiences within the gay community because of their race. And a Black gay man and another Black gay man are likely to have extremely different life experiences as well.

Having an all-white cast is a choice. It’s no less of a choice, no less contrived than having a more diverse cast. People like to say that they feel like trying to have more diversity in their cast takes away from the storyline because they have to try to intentionally insert different races into their casts. But picking “Black” or “Middle Eastern” or “Asian” or “Latino” is no more contrived than picking “White”. One of them is just constantly fed to us as “normal”.

Seriously. All of your fretting can end if you just stop having tokens.

Write tons of POC with a variety of backgrounds and write all kinds of queer people and disabled people and people of all different kinds of genders and financial situations and countries of origin and families of origin and types of personalities and mental health statuses and experiences and fears and drives and strengths and weaknesses and etc etc etc just do it, okay??

(via equuslupus)

twilightramblings

erikadprice

I don’t know if this advice is offered to people first publishing their books…

twilightramblings:

But really cheap Kindle books are the first ones I look at. Good cover is essential and a good description but if I’m a little bit doubtful that I’m going to like the book and then I see it’s only a couple of dollars… Screw it, it’s just $2. I’ve found a handful of really good books this way. And then once you’ve got people reviewing and reading your book, then you can put the price up. Because it’s better to sell more books and make a small profit than sell none and get no profit :) 

Also, word of mouth is the most powerful marketing campaign you could ever have - and there are so many bloggers you could ask to read your book and review it. Just make sure the blogger you ask reads your type of book and ask them to do a “if you like this… you’ll love…” type of review, since most people look for books that are like ones they already like :)

(via kaylapocalypse)

emilicity

scratchedlines

emilicity:

I want to write
my history
of us.
And it will be
like all histories,
not totally true,
not at all
comprehensive
or even objective
but I promise
this to you,
I will be
honest
and
my honesty
is more than
I’ve given you
to date


but how
can I write
a history
when it’s still
taking place?

erikadprice

Hey there, my name is Brett Beeman. I have never really sought criticism or advice from anyone, when it comes to my writings. I have quite a few poems and prose, which are posted on my blog. And I have far more writings that I haven't posted. I was wondering what the benefits are to becoming published. Would it actually gain more exposure for me and my writings? Am I even good enough to become published? I guess that's my greatest concern. So I was wondering if someone could provide me answers.

Hi Brett. Thanks for your question. 

Is there a benefit to getting published? It depends on what your goals are. If you work to get published, you can build a list of writing/publication credits that you can use to…get published again, basically. Some magazines and journals take submissions more seriously when they come from a previously published author. It makes you seem more legitimate. 

Sometimes, if the publications are big enough, publishing can earn you some money. Don’t expect more than $50-75 for a piece, at the very most, especially when you’re just starting out. But no matter the fee, getting paid for your work is really nice! It can make you feel like a professional writer. It’s legitimizing and gratifying, in a way. 

Publication can also give you exposure to publishing houses, literary agents, editors, and successful writers. If you are published multiple times in several big magazines, like The Paris Review or The New Yorker or Ploughshares or Granta, you stand a much better chance of getting an agent and a book deal. You’ll have the cache of a “legitimate author” whom people have heard of. This can lead to extended writing gigs and speaking & teaching opportunities. 

But most of the time? Publication doesn’t make much of a difference. Most lit mags cannot pay you, and they usually want your work to not be previously published. They can offer “exposure” — but the readership of most lit mags is dwindlingly small. Probably no one will recognize or ‘discover’ you because you’ve been printed in a small press lit mag. And if you have a story published in a lit mag, you no longer have exclusive rights to publishing it on your own terms (e.g. on your website).

A successful blog can offer way, wayyyyy more exposure than a ton of small press publication credits. I can speak to this firsthand. Now, I submit to lit mags a lot, because I do want to be a part of that community. I get published sometimes. And I have met some great authors and editors through that process, and even made a tiny bit of money. But I’ve gotten way more feedback, book downloads, and eyeballs on my work by running a blog. 

-Erikadprice

assets

erikadprice

TWC Welcome Center turned 2 today!

TWC Welcome Center turned 2 today!

karenfelloutofbedagain

erikadprice

karenfelloutofbedagain:

if you have any short stories, prose, non-fiction, essays, etc, even remotely ready for publication, I would really enjoy having more submissions to pick from. and i know you would really enjoy being published. send em to kleftjaw@gmail.com NOW, final decisions are TOMORROW.

kaylapocalypse

erikadprice

kaylapocalypse:

I think the moment my query letters started working is the moment when I stopped writing about my book series like someone who gave birth to a beautiful child and started writing about it like a store associate on commission trying to get someone to buy something like a refrigerator or new shoes.

ericboydblog

edgeandvoidfriction

Breakout: Voices from Inside | PEN American Center

ericboydblog:

Join PEN Members and special guests for a reading of award-winning prose and poetry from the 2014 PEN Prison Writing Contest. Readings from Jackson Taylor, Randall Horton, Susan Rosenberg, and others. Featuring special readings by men and women incarcerated around the country.

GUYS!

THIS WEEK. THURSDAY. NEW YORK. 7pm. 

I’ll be reading alongside Ayana Mathis, Susan Rosenberg, and others for this PEN American Center event at the Cooper Union building. I want to see as many of you beautiful Tumblr’ers there as possible. This is an event that is very dear to me; I truly believe these men and women deserve to have their work celebrated and I aim to help in that cause. Please come out and join me.

If you need any more info, directions, whatever— just message me. We’ll all get drinks after!

PLEASE REBLOG AND SHARE

corlin

scratchedlines

A Page of Writing Advice from Me, to Me

corlin:

Just write. Just write for fun. Wherever you are, whatever you’re doing. Let it become a source of joy for you.

Take apart the works of your favorite poets, short story writers, essayists, and novelists. Tinker with them. See how they work. Create something with their parts.

Don’t be afraid to finish things. Don’t let yourself amass only beginnings of things. You learn the most from endings and endings get you whole works.

Take great amounts of time and effort to connect with your favorite writers. Make the writers your friends. But still steal from the writing. The writing should mean more to you than the writer.

Give yourself assignments. If you’re going to read books on writing, actually do the exercises. This is how you can create your own creative writing class: one student and one teacher, and only the best reading and writing assignments.

Learn to work hardest when you don’t want to work at all. Think continuously about what makes you want to write. Never let that passion go, even when you feel consumed by self-hate and self-doubt. Write as a way to connect with yourself, with others, with the whole universe. Do it today. Just write.

leaveyouapen

edgeandvoidfriction

leaveyouapen:

Accepting Submissions Now! 

leaveyouapen:

Accepting Submissions Now!